All Lewis entries for Kilmacow



Kilmacow

More information on Samuel Lewis' Topographical Dictionary of Ireland (1837)
Accompanying Lewis map for Kilkenny

DANGAN, OLD

DANGAN, OLD, a village, in the parish of KILMACOW, barony of IVERK, county of KILKENNY, and province of LEINSTER, 3 miles (N. by W.) from Waterford ; containing about 40 houses and 192 inhabitants.

GRANEY

GRANEY, a village, in the parish of KILMACOW, barony of IVERK, county of KILKENNY, and province of LEINSTER, 2 miles (N. W.) from Waterford, on the road to Clonmel ; containing 12 houses and 77 inhabitants. Fairs are held here on Jan. 6th, April 12th, May 14th, Sept. 4th, and Dec. 11th.

KILMACOW

KILMACOW, a parish, in the barony of IVERK, county of KILKENNY, and province of LEINSTER, 3 miles (N. N. W.) from Waterford, on the road to Thomastown ; containing 1923 inhabitants, of which number, 176 are in the village. It comprises 4389 statute acres, as applotted under the tithe act, and valued at £2671 per annum, and has some good limestone quarries. The village contains 31 houses, and is a constabulary police station ; petty sessions are held in it every alternate week. The living is a rectory and vicarage, in the diocese of Ossory, and in the gift of the Bishop: the tithes amount to £360. The glebe-house was erected by aid of a loan of £675 and a gift of £100 from the late Board of First Fruits ; the glebe comprises 11a. 22p. The church is a neat edifice with a handsome spire, for rebuilding which the late Board lent £850, in 1818. In the R. C. divisions this parish is the head of a union or district, comprising the parishes of Kilmacow, Dunkit, Gaulskill, Ullid, Kilbeacon, and part of Killaghy, and containing chapels at Kilmacow, Mullinavat, and Hill. The parochial school was built on land given by Mr. Roche ; about 80 children are educated in it, and about 190 in three private schools. There are some fine ruins of Grandison, or Graney, castle, consisting of the remains of the keep, the great hall, and of three circular towers, on the margin of the river Suir. It is supposed to have been erected by Pierce Butler, eighth Earl of Ormonde, and lord-deputy of Ireland in 1521. During the parliamentary war it was held by Col. Butler for Chas. I., but was finally surrendered to Col. Axtel, Cromwell's governor of Kilkenny, and was afterwards allowed to fall into decay.- See GRANEY.


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